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wanted to retire when he worked for john paul ii, asked him, john 35u8 ii, would not let that happen. he became pope after john paul ii died, but he never seemed to enjoy it the way john paul ii did, who was an actor. benedict is a scholar, a theologian, an intellectual, and today you could see the humility that those who know him very well say have always marked this 85-year-old man. >> certainly describing himself as a pilgrim is really extraordinary, and you get the feeling that the crowd, the audiences were responding to him in an emotional way that they hadn't previously. that i guess it's the moment the history, but also the sadness. i mean, this is a very bittersweet moment. >> well, it's -- it is. that's exactly the way to describe it. you know, it's interesting in st. peters square, they had the big jumbotrons out there, and people were gathered around and were actually silent in st. peters square watching what happened, and the last time i heard that kind of silence in st. peters square it was when they announced the death of john paul ii. you never heard a cell phone go off. y
, he watched as a close advisor and close friend, john paul ii, in his last years as pope, and he saw not only the angst that john paul ii went through during that time of suffering, but he also saw how the vatican works when there's a pope that's not able to at his full capacity to do his job. something he obviously had in mind in the past that he could do it. it's very surprising he did. >>steve: father jonathan are you suggesting that the pope saw pope john paul ii in his declining years and said the people of the catholic community need a pope who's at 100% or as close to it as possible, so if i ever get to that stage i'm going to call it quits, and that's what he's doing? >> you know, it seems that that is a big part of his decision. we know how close he was to john paul ii. keep in mind, though, the pope is not a manager. this is why it's so shocking. the pope is not first and foremost the manager. he's the defender of the faith, protecting or guarding the teaching of the church and of the gospel. so you don't need somebody who is a stellar manager at his full capacity necessari
this happened eight years ago when john paul died. you have this uncertainty. but you also have this other thing which is entirely new. 8:00 tonight, it's over. >> and to a certain extent, the pope and his cardinals are writing the rule books as we go along. one of these issues is, how much fanfare does the pope want as he says his good-bye. we saw the final audience yesterday. he had this emotional meeting with the cardinals this morning. is this the good-bye that he wanted? >> this is the good-bye, definitely. i mean, the people cheering right now are people in the secular state who work where i do. just two floors above where they are, the domicile. i think it's important that they were able to say good-bye. they didn't want anything huge. he had that with the audience. he's not somebody that likes big celebrations in general. i think it's only right that the people who worked with him, his clollaborators got to give him sendoff. >> as we watch his ride to the top of the hill to a white helicopter. a short ride to castel gandolfo, about 20 miles out of rome, it's his residence. and then the p
benedict who stepped in and became pope after pope john paul ii, the iconic pope of the 20th century, stepped down. of course, pope john paul ii had been pope since 1979. and so, of course, his impact felt not only in the religious world but also the political world. pope benedict, though, never really, of course, given the chance to emerge from the shadows. and it seems that for a good bit of his time, he was dogged by allegations that came through the child abuse scandal throughout certainly before his reign. he was constantly being dogged by questions regarding that. but mark halperin, an iconic figure replaced by pope benedict who has had a very short tenure and now is stepping down in a way that a lot of popes don't step down before they die. >> short tenure, and it's going to be scrutinized for some of the issues you raised. to me now thinking forward, it's going to be a very big story for catholics and others around the world including the question of will it be another european? there's going to be pressure to look to another region of the country as there was last time. i th
is going to resign his position. the end of the month. and, you know, he succeeded john paul ii who has rushed to make a saint. wrongly so, i think. not that he doesn't deserve it. you need some time. also the pope has said this is not the first -- not the first pope to retire. popes can retire. we are used to popes dying in. right? and most of them have. but a little quick research as we were getting ready to come on the air which is why i am not fully in uniform yet this morning. i will take care of this right now, the last pope i could find to resign was pope gregory xii. >> i don't remember him. >> bill: you wouldn't. back in the 15th century around 1415 or so there have been maybe a half a dozen popes to resign. he is the last one i could find. >> wow. >> yeah. there are a lot of explanations out there on twitter, supposedly for the vatican sort of indirectly saying it's for health reasons. he doesn't have the strength to serve in this role any more. so we don't know exactly what that means. there were rumors when he would resign when his butler wa
not been the most popular pope. he followed in the footsteps of john paul the ii who was such a global superstar. upon his departure a lot of people are feeling that they didn't really know what they would be missing. they've come to appreciate his cerebral intellect, his kindness, his gentle necessary and we spoke to gregg burke a short while ago, here is what he had to say about today. >> it's sad to see the pope leave saint peters, but on the other hand it's beautiful to see the pope happy and at peace. you can tell he is somebody who has been struggling physically. to think okay i'm not baggy to have all this weight on my shoulders is beautiful. >> gregg of course, one of our colleagues now working at the senior communications adviser for the vatican, very much in tune of what is going on and talked a lot about the serenity the pope is feeling now. there will be a short ceremony with the swiss guards. you may have seen footage of them colorfully dressed. that is the papal protection squad and the pope will board the helicopter to castle gandolfo where he will become pope emeritus a
succeed pope john paul ii. >> joining us is from the school of law. >> glad to be with you. >> one of my first questions, we think about the catholic church, it's been underfire and i know that you are very concerned about the moral decline of the world in general. so, when you think about the next pope, you've got to have to have somebody who will adapt and adhere to the catholic belief system. >> that's right, and i'm confident that the conclave will pick someone like that, an extremely good successor not just to benedict, but john paul iv. ap they had the history, the back-to-back, and i think there are a lot of cardinals out there who could fill those shoes. >> since you have an accurate track record of predicting the next pope, who is in the running? >> well, i'm not sure that i actually predicted it. i hoped that he would be the choice. and-- >> that's close enough. >> i don't know. you know, at this point, i don't think there's any front runner, and i think it is really impossible to predict who it's going to be. but, obviously, you have your favorites choices. i think that las ve
, john allen, who's one of the more perceptive ones. he said the legacy of john paul ii we're not going to fully appreciate until years from now and one of benedict's main job is going to be to help us unpack that ponticate. so they're going to be voluminous but it will take a while. i can rattle a few off. >> reporter: give me two. >> i would say the deep theological pro fundity than been expressed with amazing clarity and child-like simplicity. and second i would say his constant call that the church needs to be engaged with the world in culture. you know, christiane, there's some voices in the church today saying we need to retreat to the cat combs. we need to circle the wagons. ben xvi said the church is in the world. there's tons more if you ever want to invite me back. we'll go through his accomplishments. thank you, good to be with you. >> reporter: cardinal dolan, thank you very much for joining us. back to you, chris and erin. >> what a great interview, first of all. kudos for christiane. for people watching all over the world, you just got a look at what makes cardinal dolan s
the last several years of pope john paul's papacy. the poor man was so wracked with illness and kept on coming out in an ever more frail state. he hasn't canceled any engagements. we're hearing rumors that he decided no more transatlantaic travel after trips to south america. the word we're hearing is fatigue. we're going to hear conspiracy theories ranging from everything to the vatican bank to the horrible sexual scandals. pope gregory in the 1400s was forced out. it wasn't volunteer. it was like a much more pleasant version of what happened to an curry. the last time this happened was back in the 1200s so almost 700 years since this has been done voluntarily. it's really, really a shock. this had guy has always been renowned for his command of power within the vatican walls. >> listening to everything you're saying and the history there, there's got to be more behind this. it's just not a job people and you can away from, and as history has shown us, i know there are conspiracies and all. what do you think is the reason he is leaving now? >> i wouldn't want to speculate. we'll hea
back in november, right? >> that's right. and when john paul ii when he was introduced to him by benedict he said i assure you he's made his first communion, he's so young. that's the comment that benedict made to john paul ii. why i'm interested in talking a bit about him is because he's so humble. when he was bishop in the philippines, he would ride his bicycle. he would encounter all the pool on the streets. he would invite the poor in his residence to eat. there's a story about a woman who was looking for her alcoholic out-of-work husband expecting to find him in the local bar, she found him in the residence with the bishop eating lunch. he spoke very vo shumbly at thet meeting that we need someone with a lot of humbleness and silence. people are saying, wow, wouldn't it be something. he's no slouch, he studied in america, summa cum laude . >> many people said it might be an opportunity to have an african as pope, and cardinal peter turksa of ghana. >> a few strikes against him, one he's already spoken about it to the press -- >> like the cia, forget it. >> he didn't say i
done in 719 years. he has decided to ab -- he was elevated to the papacy after the death of pope john paul ii. news of this is reverb rating around the country and around the world. nearly one quarter of the united states, 74 million americans, are catholic, and worldwide there are 1.1 billion members of the church. >> encompassing a range of issues from contraception to policy. the timing of the announcement comes as a surprise. just two days before ash wednesday, which marks the start of the lentin season, the holyist period on the catholic calendar. joining us from washington, the host of msnbc's "hardball" chris matthews, and contributor and washington post columnist e.j. deon. chris, my colleague, the light in the darkness on many things political. >> right. >> what do you make of this announcement coming as it does two days before ash wednesday? it seems like a major surprise. to what degree do you think the catholic church will seize on this as a moment to pivot? >> you may think so, but i don't think so. i don't think it's going to be a moment of pivot. i think it's probably p
. >> well said. >> amen. >> i think it shows a lot of humility. in april of 2005 when pope john paul ii died we broadcasted "hardball" from rome. as we closed our last show from there, let's listen. look at these people standing for hours, day and night, through the avenues of rome, packed together as if they had been caught and crushed in an industrial strength trash compacter. there they stood seeking no edge, plotting no photo opportunity, playing none of the games that people do in politics, in business, in so much of life. this is no pub lisible stunt or initial stock offering or inside deal or anything but the purest most obvious most grandly transparent display of individual devotion. voting with your feet. >> thanks four your wise and warm words. thanks for coming on and enl deon, mr. america and french canadian and all kind of things. >>> dick cheney from the sublime to the ridiculous. dick cheney can't stand the fact that his side lost the election, dick. that he and his neocons are under assault and in retreat thank god. he's saying president obama is picking second class people.
all been worked out by a decree that pope john paul ii came up with maybe three years before he died, and the critical moment which is sort of an answer to your question. the criminal moment is when each cardinal has the ballot in his hands, and before he puts it in the urn, he has to repeat an oath, and you're standing in front of michelangelo's last judgment, so that wall adds always to the deal. you have this in your hand. you say something like this. i can't translate it exactly from latin. you call upon the lord jesus, my savior, as my witness. he who will judge me. you are looking at the -- he who will judge me that the man i am voting for is the one who under god i believe god wants to be pope. in a certain sense it makes it not any more an election. it makes it a discernment. you are trying to figure out what you think god would want. what man you think god would want for all the needs of the church today. it's a fascinating moment. you do it every time you vote, so it's something -- you never can forget. >> well, i never knew that before. you bring this new information that
. i was here when pope john paul ii died in 2005, and it was completely different atmosphere. on this occasion, very much an opportunity for people, the faithful, to come and contemplate the legacy of pope benedict. many appreciated him as a teacher, a thinker, an intellectual. somebody who had the courage to confront many of the issues that have plagued the church over the last decade or so. the question of, for instance, pedophilia and the priesthood and other things. very much what they heard from people is they appreciated him as someone who faced and grappled with serious issues and appreciated the fact that he had the courage to step down at this point in his life. >> ben wedeman for thus morning. thank you for the update. you can hear them breaking down from the mass said a little bit this morning. here is what will happen from now on from here. pope benedict xvi has amended the conclave law. they don't have to wait for 16 days after the papacy is vacant. cardinals under the age of 80 will take part. four ballots a day. b ballots get counted twice daily. and dark smoke
and john paul jones are capricorns saying they are quite contained in their own worlds. he said i'm not the bad guy, you need to see the capricorns. i have nothing to do in 2014. >> bill: every other band has come back. >> sure. but they can't have a led zeppelin reunion without john bonnam. i mean he was it. >> bill: yeah, this train is coming down the track and we are starting right in front of it, and it is going to be hell on wheels, and i'm talking about the sequester. maybe more people would take it more seriously if it had a better word. it's like infrastructure -- infrastructure is so damn important. it's power systems roads, sewer plants water treatment plants. but with that word, people just don't want to talk about it so it doesn't get the at attention it needs. same thing with sequester. i saw a guy -- they are doing construction at the building next door. yesterday morning i saw a guy with a sledge hammer whacking the side of the building and that's what the sequester is. you take a meat axe to the federal budget and go wham across the board, and i
tradition has yet to catch fire. an effort begun by benedict's much loved predecessor, pope john paul ii. mind you any comparison between benedict and celebrity pope is invidious. a point made by fair-minded editorial writers. sex abuse scandal in church, involving homosexual priests continue to march catholic teaching and carries with it a whiff of sulfur. pope paul the vi a warned satan had earned the temple of god. working to eradicate the stain of abuse and apologizing publicly to victims and their families. in a move long overdo he recently fired the morally challenged cardinal roger mahoney of the los angeles diocese. it must be said, however, that while the church enemies have warmed to the scandal, too often catholics and n name only have used it as an excuse to ignore the teachings of the faith they long abandoned. and benedict's rest anything says the authority of the church is ambiguous. speculation runs high who will lead more than a billion catholics. although a fruitless guessing game often fueled by conspiracy theories. whoever is chosen will face grave sin. just last week
-day timetable to start the process to choose a new pope were set in 1996 by pope john paul ii and only could be changed by another pope. that is what ben dick today benedict did today, one of his last official acts. he gave his final sunday blessing to huge crowds in st. peter's square. no date is set for the conclave to begin. in order to have a new pope by the start of holy week, a new pope would have be installed by sunday, march 17th. the date change comes amid the news there will be one less cardinal voting in the enclave. cardinal keith o'brien of scotland, britain's highest ranking catholic leader is retiring and will not be attending. his resignation of archbishop of edinburgh is part of a mandatory age requirement because he is 75 years old but it comes in the wake of allegations of misconduct. british newspapers report that o'brien has been accused by three current priests and one former priest of acting inappropriately with them in the 19 80s. the cardinal said he will not monday that he will not attend the conclave because he does not want media attention focused on him dur
, pope benedict xvi does have something on pope john paul ii, the catholic church experienced a 6% increase in favorability, up from 56% during pope john paul ii's tenure and that's what the survey says. >>> coming up, she beats out her husband in almost every popularity poll. now michelle obama is back on the road and we'll look at what the second term may hold for the first lady. >>> first, the latest from south africa on where the olympic star accused of murder is now a day after being released on bail. you're watching msnbc. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a heart attack. we're more than 78,000 people looking out for more than 70 million americans. that's health in numbers. unitedhealthcare. >>> more than 100 days after hurricane sand e some storm victims
. >> here is the millionaire question of the day. where did paul mccartney and john lennon first meet? stay tuned for the answer when we come back. >> welcome back. the answer to the millionaire question of the day is in a church. joining me now is francis salazar from patchogue, new york. nice to see you, francis. >> great to be here. meredith: special ed teacher. >> thank you. meredith: brought along your beautiful wife terry who's in the audience. nice to see terry. and the big news here is that the two of you are expecting a baby, which is very exciting. so we got to start sprucing up the nursery. gotta start sprucing up that nursery. >> absolutely. that's what we're hoping for. meredith: well, i hope so, too, and a cruise wouldn't be bad either. >> ha ha. yeah. absolutely. meredith: so let's take a look at the money in your round 1. computer, please randomize the money and the questions. now let's see where your disney cruise question is. oh, way down low. whoa. all right, francis, are you ready? >> i am ready. meredith: then let's play "millionaire." [cheering] according to a 2011 stu
. we are very grateful for him to part -- for participating. andrew koppelman is the john paul stevens professor of law at northwestern university. he received his bachelor's from the university of chicago and his jd and phd from yale law school. his scholarship focuses on issues at the intersection of law and political philosophy. he is the author of "defending american religious neutrality," and several other books. and more than 80 articles and scholarly journals. sherif girgis is a phd student in philosophy at princeton university and a jd candidate at yale law school. after graduating from princeton , where he won prizes for best senior thesis in ethics and philosophy, as well as the dante society prize, he obtained a degree from the university of oxford as a rhodes scholar. he is the author of a recent book "what is marriage," described as the most formidable defense of traditional marriage ever written. we are grateful to him for participating in this event. >> thank you so much for the introduction. thanks, everyone, for coming. a special thanks to professor koppelman. i have a
for participating. andrew koppelman is the john paul stevens professor of law at northwestern university. he received his bachelor's from the university of chicago and his jd and phd from yale law school. his scholarship focuses on issues at the intersection of law and political philosophy. he is the author of "defending american religious neutrality," and several other books. and more than 80 articles and scholarly journals. sherif girgis is a phd student in philosophy at princeton university and a jd candidate at yale law school. after graduating from princeton, where he won prizes for best senior thesis in ethics and philosophy, as well as the dante society prize, he obtained a degree from the university of oxford as a rhodes scholar. he is the author of a recent book "what is marriage," described as the most formidable defense of traditional marriage ever written. we are grateful to him for participating in this event. >> thank you so much for the introduction. thanks, everyone, for coming. a special thanks to professor koppelman. i have a pleasure of speaking on the panel with him befor
was very much like a battlefield, it's made a huge difference. in east philly john paul jones middle school had a reputation. >> police used to come to this school. used to be on lockdown. >> fight like these captured from a cell phone from the nearby middle school were common here, too. mold, fleas and rats ravaged the library so badly school officials had to throw away thousands of books. >> when i first came, i was pretty nervous. i thought it was going to be a little scary. >> the nickname came before the bars on the windows and doors. jones jail. >> but last september eighth grader tre'von williams says something happened. >> this became a whole new school. >> school district officials turned it into a charter school, gave it a new name and facelift and then called in the military. >> we needed to have people who are good role models, who believe in education and believe in youth development, and people that had a commitment really to america, and who else but veterans? >> i enlisted when i was 17. my parents signed for me. >> patrick's father is a vietnam vet and a purple heart recipi
the kind of italian curia that is the traditional source of popes until really pope john paul. and i think we'll end up with a similarly conservative pope. >> yeah, reverend al asked me during the commercial break what i thought. not that i would know anything about who's going to be the next pope. but one thing's for certain. given the last two popes' selection of cardinals throughout the world, they are all invariably quite conservative. so the next pope is going to, more probably than not, be similarly conservative. it's a bag job, the college of cardinals. they have rigged the deck. they have rigged the deck. >> but what you'll have, too -- >> spoken like a true catholic. >> you could have the first african pope. you could have the first latino pope. but ironically, those guys would be very conservative. you know, the growth of the church in africa is a very conservative movement. the same thing in latin america, although there's a bit of a protestant refirmation. he will be very conservative. >> everybody's talking about the possibility of an african pope. i just don't think it's goin
was standing in precisely the same place back in 2005, eight years ago when pope john paul ii died and we went into the conclave which finally produced pope benedict xvi. that took a week and several false starts. when they can't come to a consensus you have the black smoke emanating from that special chimney in st. peter's and then finally the white smoke and then you don't even know who it is until the archbishop deacon cardinals deacon comes to the window and announces a new pope and only after that the new pope comes to the within to and is greeted. but that was still at least two weeks away. at least tweaks away from that being finalized. >> is the italian media still all over the scandals that are going on involving sex and intrigue, all that stuff that we've seen in those rome newspapers over the past few days, or have they moved on? >> well, they pretty much moved on. that of course was a big story over the weekend and into monday, the beginning of this week. as you can imagine it drove the vatican mad. they were really angry, angry with the press for writing about it, angry for people
discrimination. but being a judge, and it's a pretty good job to have, think of my colleague, justice john paul stevens who remain on the court until he was 90, and is still an avid golfer and tennis player, has recently written a book, not about himself, but about the five chiefs that he had known from the time he was a law clerk until the time he retired from the court. so, next question. [laughter] >> justice ginsburg, you've had an amazing career and are leaving your legacy in the law. looking back on your life, although there's still more to do, but looking back on what you have done so far, is there anything you would do differently? >> it's a question, and i don't ask myself, and i'll give you two pieces of advice i was given in that regard. when i was a brand-new judge on the d.c. circuit, one of my senior colleagues said ruth, i've been at this business a long time, and one thing i'd like to embark to you, do your best job in each case, but when it's over, when the opinion is out, don't look back. don't worry about things that have passed. go on to the next case, and give it your all.
. john is right. paul ryan was against it, the president walked away from it, we could not get a bipartisan consensus for a plan that would revitalize the economy, produce growth and create jobs. it is a tragedy. >> i talked to a republican congressman why not vote for sink such and they say because of tax increases but i say you have already raised taxes, they have done that. >> the real answer they will not put the country first. how do we grow our economy? this washington game is all about their power and position and why the congress has 11 percent rating together. >> gentleman, all love to talk to you about what is going on in our country. can you get more from the political insiders every monday at 10:30 a.m. eastern and they will be back here next sunday, you can also follow them on twitter at "insiders." >>heather: a consume group is pushing the f.d.a. to put the squeeze on how much sugar goes into your favorite soft drink but is government regulation the answer? hi. hi. i'm here to pick up some cacti. it should be under stephens. the verizon share everything plan for s
the senate took up that same bill and even though it was hand-crafted by john boehner, eric cantor, and paul ryan, minority leader mitch mcconnell and 32 other republican senators opposed it. mcconnell's office released a statement saying leader mcconnell and other senate republicans had several amendments aimed forcing washington to cut government spending, but all were defeated by democrats. as a result, the leader simply couldn't support the bill. the word on capitol hill is that mcconnell's no vote was meant to appease his unruly kentucky constituents. perhaps angered over mcconnell's compromise on the fiscal cliff made last month with vice president joe biden. that deal averted a potential downgrade of america's credit rating. speaker boehner's bill to extend the debt limit did much the same, but for the extreme right wing flank of the gop, supporting two bills to prevent possibly catastrophic damage to the u.s. economy is perhaps one bill too far. glen, we talk a lot about the tunnel that ends in heart break that the gop may or may not be hurdling down, but these votes lately on the hi
unless they got cuts, there would have lost that the raid at the end. big loss that debate. john boehner and paul rand did a great job together. you cannot govern from that office, you but you have to be very careful about high-profile last-minute negotiations. i've worked in the white house and three administrations. the president has a tremendous institutional advantage in these kinds of fights. what republicans have to do is avoid these fights, the straps that they are laying. provide an alternative through passing legislation, just to show this is how they would govern if they had the powers of the presidency and the senate. and be careful. there are some rough edges. host: some are not strategy as far as moving the debt ceiling ahead. guest: if they had gone ahead with it, it would have been politically cataclysmic. it was the worst percival -- worst possible ground to make their point. president obama 1. i think it's absolutely crucial for the future of the country that you cannot govern from the house. some house republicans, i am sympathetic to their concerns. their enthusiasm tr
of the most celebrated after-parties in the world. paul vercammen has more on that. >> reporter: from the governor's ball. to the "vanity fair" party. to elton john's famous fund-raiser, hollywood knows how to let loose on oscar night. >> we're able to come here and get our message across and raise money and have a good time at the same time. >> reporter: sir elton and david fernish celebrated their event. heidi klum, nicki minaj and jane lynch were on-hand. >> i thought it was a wonderful show. i loved it. i loved the movies. it was great. >> reporter: across town at the "vanity fair" soiree, sandra bullock, and richard gere, all hit the red carpet before partying it up inside. and presenter, halle berry, revealed what she thought was the biggest surprise of the night. >> ang lee. i thought surprised everybody. but so deserved. i loved "life of pi." >> reporter: at the governor's ball after-party, the night's big winners bumped shoulders with hollywood icons. >> octessica. we're the supercouple. >> what are you going to do tonight? >> i don't know. it depends on what and who is in th
to make of this ted cruz. >> ted cruz was elected by a group of tea party maniacs. i get why rand paul does it another tea party crazy elected by tea party crazies. but john mccain who once was a maverick, you know, the creator of mccain-feingold, somebody who usually is moderate i don't expect that from him. this is just not -- this is just not john mccain behavior. >> it's kind of sick i think what john mccain has done with himself over a couple of different issues but specifically the chuck hagel thing. this was a guy that said chuck hagel would be qualified to serve in any leadership role. i don't get it. mccain looks silly in all of this. >> completely silly. at the end of the day, it makes me big the question like john, mccain what are you thinking? you were such a legend somebody who people applauded and looked up to. you could have had a career like ted kennedy. could have. but you are just squandering it, absolutely, positively squand squandering it. i remember when teddy passed and they had the people on the hill people lining the streets of the arli
country and our world stronger, safer, fairer, and better. >> john kerry was sworn in yesterday and brings in the doughnuts for his new job monday morning. good mof. but a cnn political ed other tore paul steinhauser explains the hot topic is what could happen in four years. >> hey, miguel. it's the biggest question in presidential politics. will she run? the she, of course, is now former secretary of state hillary clinton. when asked in a global town hall a few days ago if she was thinking of making another bid for the white house, this was her answer. >> i am not thinking about anything like that right now. >> here's what she said the same day in an interview with cnn. >> have you decided that you absolutely will not run? >> well, i have absolutely no plans to run. >> no plans, but she isn't closing the door. clinton's returning to private life with poll numbers any politician would love. nearly seven in ten in a recent poll said they approved of the job she was doing as america's top dip low mat. and two-thirds said they had a favorable impression of her. but two things there was a part
through a republican primary. maybe they carve up the reasonable vote and rand paul walks through without looking. >> we know that jeb bush won the election in 2008. >> john mccain -- >> he also won, he took a hard line against immigration but was seen as a liberal republican earlier in his year. >> earlier in his career. >> at different points in his career. we tend to believe that moderate republicans can not get through the process but they have shown that it ends up happening. >> do they not get through the process, at the expense of, and look at the last republican primary as the example, by the time mitt romney picked up the nomination after the 112 republican debates that we were judged to. >> and somewhere to the right of herman cain >> i want do not think it's fair to paint taall the republicans with the mitt romney brush. >> the point that was being made is that even if you are not as. right leaning, as some would have you -- some folks may have you to -- some may try to paint you to be. by the time the primary is over, you have really come across -- >> it's true for both partie
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